National Women’s History Month

0

IMG_0897

Women got the vote in 1920, but it wasn’t an easy path.  Many women (and men) contributed to the arduous journey to political emancipation.

North Hill has many, many inspirational books celebrating those brave women who risked everything and pushed against hostile forces to gain what we now regard as normal.

 

 

 

Share

Rock Your Paper with Scissors

0

March is National Craft Month.

IMG_0899Can you draw?  Can you fold paper? Can you sew?  Let the books at North Hill inspire you to create.

Share

Snow Painting at North Hill

0



??????????????????????
Children from North Hill’s preschool story time learned about shadows. We had a sunny day and made hand shadows and did other funny movements and jumped up and down. We talked about how the sun moves overhead and that our shadows will be in different places in a few minutes.

 

 

Snow Painting 9  2-10-2015Then we went outside to paint on the snow. The children used diluted tempera paint in squirt bottles to make squiggles and circles, squares and triangles of orange, red, blue and green.

 

 

???????????????????????????????They noticed that the paint only melted a tiny bit of the snow. For today the colors stayed near the surface. We also talked about how the snow will melt when it gets warmer.

Share

Evening Book Discussion

0

BDG

Monday, March 2 at  6:30 pm  

Book: The Monuments Men  by Robert Edsel

Join us for our Monday book discussion group on March 2  at 6:30 p.m.   We will be discussing The Monuments Men by Robert Edsel while enjoying some light refreshments.  New members are always welcome to this lively discussion group where you can meet other book lovers and find out what books they are reading and raving about.  Books will be available at the service desk one month prior to the discussion, or find a copy here  in our library system and have one sent for you to pick up.

 

monuments men

At the same time Adolf Hitler was attempting to take over the western world, his armies were methodically seeking and hoarding the finest art treasures in Europe. The Fuehrer had begun cataloguing the art he planned to collect as well as the art he would destroy: “degenerate” works he despised. In a race against time, behind enemy lines, often unarmed, a special force of American and British museum directors, curators, art historians, and others, called the Momuments Men, risked their lives scouring Europe to prevent the destruction of thousands of years of culture. Focusing on the eleven-month period between D-Day and V-E Day, this fascinating account follows six Monuments Men and their impossible mission to save the world’s great art from the Nazis.

 

Share

Newbery Award Winners

0

2015 Medal Winner

the CrossoverThe Crossover, written by Kwame Alexander

“With a bolt of lightning on my kicks . . .The court is SIZZLING. My sweat is DRIZZLING. Stop all that quivering. Cuz tonight I’m delivering, ” announces dread-locked, 12-year old Josh Bell. He and his twin brother Jordan are awesome on the court.

But Josh has more than basketball in his blood, he’s got mad beats, too, that tell his family’s story in verse, in this fast and furious middle grade novel of family and brotherhood from Kwame Alexander ( He Said, She Said 2013).

Josh and Jordan must come to grips with growing up on and off the court to realize breaking the rules comes at a terrible price, as their story’s heart-stopping climax proves a game-changer for the entire family.

 

El DeafoEl Deafo, written and illustrated by Cece Bell

“In this insightful and humorous graphic novel memoir, Cece Bell portrays growing up with a giant hearing aid strapped to her chest. Themes of navigating a new school, sleepovers, finding a true friend and a first crush make this book universal in appeal. Bell shows that our differences are gifts that “can be turned into something amazing.”

 

 

 

 

Brown Girl DreamingBrown Girl Dreaming, written by Jacqueline Woodson

Jacqueline Woodson’s lyrical memoir chronicles the incidents and emotions she experienced as an African-American girl growing up in the 1960s and 1970s. Precise language magnifies moments and connects them to the larger historical narrative. Her elegant and evocative stand-alone poems weave a story about her development from a struggling reader and dreamer into a confident young woman and writer.

Share

Death by Chocolate

0

Death By ChocolateNorth Hill features chocolate-themed  mysteries.

Share

“Reel” Love at North Hill

0

Round TableMovies to share with that special one on Valentine’s Day!

Share

Teens Create!

0

Teens Create!

Monthly DIY project for those in 4th grade and up.

January is a tough month for birds in Ohio, so we picked a project that would help the birds find food during the cold, snowy winter.  There are many recipes for making bird feeders, but we chose one without nuts of any kind-just flour, water, corn syrup and bird seed–things you may already have at home!

Here we are stirring the ingredients together:

seed stir

And after carefully shaping the sticky seed mix onto a tray:

seed tray

The straws are there to make a hole for twine after they harden, so they can hang outside.

And the finished product–after drying overnight:

seeds

Next month’s DIY project will be on February 21.  Join us for the next creative project!

Share

Monday Book Discussion

0

BDG

Monday, February 2 at  3:00 pm  

Book: The House Girl  by Tara Conklin

Join us for our Monday book discussion group on January 5  at 3;00 p.m.   We will be discussing The House Girl by Tara Conklin while enjoying some light refreshments.  New members are always welcome to this lively discussion group where you can meet other book lovers and find out what books they are reading and raving about.  Books will be available at the service desk one month prior to the discussion, or find a copy here  in our library system and have one sent for you to pick up.

Two remarkable women, separated by more than a century, whose lives unexpectedly intertwine . . . 2004: Lina Sparrow is an ambitious young lawyer working on a historic class-action lawsuit seeking reparations for the descendants of American slaves. 1852: Josephine is a seventeen-year-old house slave who tends to the mistress of a Virginia tobacco farm–an aspiring artist named Lu Anne Bell. It is through her father, renowned artist Oscar Sparrow, that Lina discovers a controversy rocking the art world: art historians now suspect that the revered paintings of Lu Anne Bell, an antebellum artist known for her humanizing portraits of the slaves who worked her Virginia tobacco farm, were actually the work of her house slave, Josephine. A descendant of Josephine’s would be the per-fect face for the lawsuit–if Lina can find one. But nothing is known about Josephine’s fate following Lu Anne Bell’s death in 1852. In piecing together Josephine’s story, Lina embarks on a journey that will lead her to question her own life, including the full story of her mother’s mysterious death twenty years before. Alternating between antebellum Virginia and modern-day New York, this searing tale of art and history, love and secrets explores what it means to repair a wrong, and asks whether truth can be more important than justice.

 

Share

Monday Book Discussion

0

BDG

Monday, January 5  3:00 pm  

Book: Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter  by Tom Franklin

Join us for our Monday book discussion group on January 5  at 3;00 p.m.   We will be discussing Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter by Tom Franklin while enjoying some light refreshments.  New members are always welcome to this lively discussion group where you can meet other book lovers and find out what books they are reading and raving about.  Books will be available at the service desk one month prior to the discussion, or find a copy here  in our library system and have one sent for you to pick up.

crookedTom Franklin’s extraordinary talent has been hailed by the leading lights of contemporary literature–Philip Roth, Richard Ford, Lee Smith, and Dennis Lehane. Reviewers have called his fiction “ingenious” (USA Today) and “compulsively readable” (Memphis Commercial Appeal). His narrative power and flair for characterization have been compared to the likes of Harper Lee, Flannery O’Connor, Elmore Leonard, and Cormac McCarthy. Now the Edgar Award-winning author returns with his most accomplished and resonant novel so far–an atmospheric drama set in rural Mississippi. In the late 1970s, Larry Ott and Silas “32” Jones were boyhood pals. Their worlds were as different as night and day: Larry, the child of lower-middle-class white parents, and Silas, the son of a poor, single black mother. Yet for a few months the boys stepped outside of their circumstances and shared a special bond. But then tragedy struck: Larry took a girl on a date to a drive-in movie, and she was never heard from again. She was never found and Larry never confessed, but all eyes rested on him as the culprit. The incident shook the county–and perhaps Silas most of all. His friendship with Larry was broken, and then Silas left town. More than twenty years have passed. Larry, a mechanic, lives a solitary existence, never able to rise above the whispers of suspicion. Silas has returned as a constable. He and Larry have no reason to cross paths until another girl disappears and Larry is blamed again. And now the two men who once called each other friend are forced to confront the past they’ve buried and ignored for decades.

Share